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Make Your Voice Heard

Help preserve wilderness in Nopiming Provincial Park

Write a letter now!

Nopiming Provincial park is a wild destination for more than 100,000 people every year. With lots of undeveloped lakes and forests, as well as rivers to paddle down, Nopiming allows access to a peaceful wilderness while also providing a haven for wildlife.

Over the years, human activity has diminished the wild nature of this region, and it’s time we worked harder at preserving Nopiming. 

Woodland caribou and moose populations are threatened, all-terrain vehicles are leaving their mark and military training activity is degrading lakeshores in south Nopiming. Mining activity is bulldozing through the park, and leaving long-lasting scars.

The Manitoba government has released the Draft Management plan for Nopiming Provincial Park, and they are asking for public comment until November 30, 2015.

There are some good points in the draft plan, such as protecting more of the park and controlling all-terrain vehicle (ATV) use. But they’ve also missed an opportunity to remove mining from the park and get rid of destructive military training.

When the government first asked for input on their plan in 2014, the Wilderness Committee produced a document called A Greenprint for Nopiming Provincial Park, which explains what we think is needed to maintain nature and wilderness in the park.

Now the Wilderness Committee has produced a detailed critique of the draft plan, highlighting improvements that need to be made to preserve Nopiming’s nature and wilderness. Please take the time to read it here, and then write a letter to government asking them to implement these recommendations.

Write your letter now!


Photo: Moose in Nopiming Provincial Park, Manitoba (Eric Reder).

Tell the Manitoba government to stop Energy East

Write your letter now!

The Energy East pipeline proposal is fraught with risk. From the guaranteed release of climate-changing greenhouse gases associated with the pipeline to the risks of a spill in our waterways, to the damages and industrial development in Manitoba’s beloved Whiteshell Provincial Park, Energy East is simply a bad idea.

That’s why we’re asking you to let the Manitoba government know how strongly you feel that this pipeline should not go ahead.

While the federal government is keen to push a fossil fuel future upon us, we can tell Manitoba’s provincial government to STOP ENERGY EAST!

Write your letter now >>

End Logging in Ontario and Manitoba Parks

Write a letter now!

Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario and Duck Mountain Provincial Park in Manitoba are two popular parks that share the dubious distinction of being the last two Canadian parks with long-term logging operations continuing inside their boundaries.

The idea of industrial activity in a park may not have raised any alarm bells in the past, but times have changed. The federal government removed industrial activity from national parks in 1930, and both the Manitoba and Ontario governments have ended logging in all provincial parks – except Duck Mountain and Algonquin.

Shockingly, today 61 per cent of Duck Mountain Park and 65 per cent of Algonquin Park are available for forestry activity.

Logging in parks is an assault on our parks, and it’s contrary to what Canadians believe a park should be. Logging roads slice nature apart and cause fragmentation that is destructive to wilderness and wildlife habitat.

To learn more about this issue, please read our new educational report, End Logging in Ontario and Manitoba Parks.

The respected voices of the Environment Commissioner of Ontario and the Clean Environment Commission in Manitoba have stated that logging in parks must stop.

It’s time for us to end park logging, once and for all.

Please use our letter-writing tool to let the Premiers of Manitoba and Ontario know that you want to end logging in provincial parks.

Click here to write your letter now!


Photo: Logs in a clearcut at Duck Mountain Provincial Park, Manitoba (Eric Reder).

Help protect the Lower Bird River

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The Bird River is a real conservation hotspot in Manitoba, one that we’ve highlighted in our recent educational report, Wild Manitoba: 5 Natural Treasures at Risk. This region encompasses a wealth of wildlife, is relatively pristine and is accessible for many people by foot or by paddle.

However, mining plans pose an imminent risk to the Bird River. 

Cabot Corporation, the company that operates the Tanco Mine at Bernic Lake, proposed a plan to drain water from Bernic Lake – a lake that has been contaminated from their mine operations – into the Bird River. After many Manitobans appealed to the provincial government about this issue, the application to drain the lake was withdrawn. But a new mining claim has been discovered on the banks of the river.

The Wilderness Committee is proposing a new protected area to encompass the lower Bird River, one that will protect it and the surrounding lands for future generations.

Please join us in our campaign by sending a letter to the Manitoba government, asking them to permanently protect the lands and waters of the lower Bird River.

Write a letter now >>


Photo: The lower Bird River (Eric Reder).

Protect these 5 natural treasures now!

Write a letter!

Manitobans are fortunate to have access to many stunning wild lakes, rivers, and forests. These wild places are both beautiful and necessary to our survival, and our ability to thrive within a functioning ecosystem. The Wilderness Committee has identified five key areas in Manitoba that urgently require protection from our provincial government.

These areas include:

  • Lower Bird River
  • Red Deer Lake
  • Duck Mountain Provincial Park (where logging is still permitted)
  • Churchill and Hudson Bay polar bear habitat
  • Nopiming-Owl Lake caribou habitat

You can read more about the threatened wilderness areas listed above in our educational report, Wild Manitoba: 5 Natural Treasures at Risk.

Safeguarding these natural treasures will put us on the path to the Wilderness Committee's target: to see 20 per cent of Manitoba protected by the year 2020. But to achieve this goal, we need your help!

Take action today by writing to Manitoba’s Premier, letting him know how much you support efforts to protect the province’s wilderness.

Write your letter today >>


Photo: Lower Bird River (Eric Reder).

Stop mining in Manitoba's Provincial Parks

Manitoba is one of the few jurisdictions in the world to allow mining activity in provincial parks. Our province has 14 parks and one park reserve that are under threat from the destructive mining industry. The parks play host to a staggering 792 mining claims, 22 mineral exploration projects and 4 mineral exploration licenses. Some of these are in the province’s most well-known parks, including Whiteshell, Nopiming, Paint Lake and Grass River. We know these parks need to be protected so they can provide ecosystem services such as water and air filtration, biological diversity and climate regulation. Parks also provide us with places to relax, learn and enjoy the magnificent wilderness Manitoba offers. Mining definitely does not support healthy ecosystems, provide recreational value nor does it fit into the vision of our provincial park system.

Help Stop the Manitoba "Peat Rush"

Manitoba is suffering from a “peat rush” right now, with companies currently trying to get approval to strip mine thousands of hectares of boreal lowlands to harvest peat moss. Peatlands, however, are an important part of a healthy Manitoba environment.

Peatlands, which are all wetlands, are natural filters that provide and store clean, clear fresh water. Peat lowlands also provide important habitat for unique plant species like the carnivorous pitcher plant (right), as well as moose. But the most significant benefit of peatlands is that they store vast amounts of carbon, which helps mitigate the impacts of climate change.

Mining peat will reduce or eliminate all of these ecological benefits.

Please write to the Minister for Conservation and Water Stewardship, and let him know your opinion on this important public land issue.

Write your letter today!

Voice your opinion on the new Red Deer Lake WMA

One of the most effective ways to bring change is to write a letter to your elected representatives. Although it takes a little more time, a simple typed or handwritten letter is considered to represent 500 like-minded citizens. Writing a short letter is one of the easiest ways to exercise your voice and participate in active citizenry which is crucial to ensuring your vision for the future is heard.