The Heart of the Boreal

Stretching from the east side of Manitoba’s Lake Winnipeg far into the province of Ontario is one of the greatest natural areas left on earth. The Heart of the Boreal is a vast wilderness filled with jack pine-covered granite ridges, black spruce and tamarack lowlands, and more lakes than you can imagine. Over sixty First Nation communities have lived here for generations, most of them still beyond the reach of roads. The Heart of the Boreal is the largest roadless intact forest in the northern hemisphere, second in size only to the undisturbed Amazon rainforest on the entire planet.

The boreal forest, which circles the globe’s northern regions, is of tremendous importance to all our health and well-being. It is the earth’s greatest source of fresh water and the largest terrestrial storehouse of carbon. The boreal region plays a crucial role in regulating our climate and cleaning the air we breathe. Given these benefits, it is no surprise the United Nations is considering the Heart of the Boreal for World Heritage site status.

Five First Nations in Manitoba and Ontario have nominated their traditional territories in the Heart of the Boreal for a U.N. World Heritage Site, for both its natural and cultural significance. The Pimachiowin Aki World Heritage Project is led by Poplar River, Little Grand Rapids, Pauingassi, Bloodvein and Pikangikum First Nations, and will protect 4.3 million hectares of their lands and waters from industrial development.

Logging, mining, and hydroelectric development all threaten the Heart of the Boreal right now. The Wilderness Committee is working to ensure that the majority of the Heart of the Boreal is preserved with large, interconnected protected areas, and that the vision and values of First Nations involved are honoured and respected.

 

Google Map of Heart of the Boreal
Heart of the Boreal is shown in medium green colour, while a proposed UN World Heritage Site is shown in dark green colour. Hear ot the Boreal is the largest intact forest left on earth next to the Amazon, at just under 400,000 square kilometres of boreal forest, lakes and streams. The Wilderness Committee is working to ensure that the majority of the Heart of the Boreal is preserved with large, interconnected protected areas, and that the vision and values of First Nations involved are honoured and respected.


View Heart of the Boreal in a larger map

Donate to this campaign

Recent Developments

1 year 33 weeks ago
I drifted through a reflection of stars last week, paddling on a quiet river in Hollow Water territory late into the night. I ate my first wild strawberry of the season, and saskatoons, too. Pickerel and sauger were hooked on the river, and some even ended up in the pan. These lands and waters provide food, just as they provide opportunity to unwind and bask in nature.
1 year 39 weeks ago
  Waanibiigaa Aki: A Legacy for all Manitobans There are few places on this planet left untouched by industrialization. In an increasingly populated world, natural areas are becoming ever more valuable, simply because they are still whole. The lands and waters of Hollow Water First Nation territory are on the edge of the gretaest intact forest left on Earth – the Heart of the Boreal – and their care will be a legacy for all Manitobans.
1 year 41 weeks ago
Media Advisory - May 21, 2013 WINNIPEG – The Wilderness Committee will be co-hosting a panel event tomorrow, Wednesday, May 22nd to draw attention the diversity of wildlife in Manitoba and the threats species face due to development.

Regional News & Events

WC In the News

Monday, February 11, 2013 (All day)
Winnipeg Free Press
Wednesday, October 24, 2012 (All day)
The Uniter
Syndicate content