Imagine a Canada without killer whales, grizzly bears, spotted owls, caribou or wild salmon. These iconic species are integral to our national heritage, yet over 700 species are currently classified as at-risk. We campaign for strong laws to protect all endangered species.

Our Campaigns

Photo: Isabelle Groc
Photo: Isabelle Groc
Southern mountain caribou are threatened by industrial logging eliminating large swaths of their old-growth forest habitat. This sub-population of woodland caribou belonging to BC and Alberta, need these forests for a source of their main food in winter – tree lichens.
Photo: Chris Bidleman
Photo: Chris Bidleman
A specific class of pesticides called neonicotinoids (neonics) are harmful to bees and it’s slowly being recognized and banned, all over the world but Canada still hasn’t banned this harmful pesticide. Bees may be small, but the impact they have on our environment – and our daily lives – is immense.
Caribou are an iconic species, featured prominently on Canada’s 25-cent coin. Boreal woodland caribou are a variety of caribou, related to the caribou living in the north. Boreal caribou live in forests, and travel much shorter distances every year, if at all.
Photo: Joe Foy
Photo: Joe Foy
Grizzly bears hold a special place in our hearts and conjure up images of rugged and unspoiled wilderness. But conflict with humans and habitat encroachment have left many populations of this iconic giant on the brink of extinction. The grizzly bear has been eliminated from the Canadian prairies where it was once abundant.
Photo; Joe Foy
Photo; Joe Foy
Wild Pacific salmon – Sockeye, Coho, Chinook, Chum and Pink – are the lifeblood of the West Coast, supporting Orcas, Grizzlies, other wildlife, forests, First Nations, coastal communities and tourism. Wild salmon are in trouble. Effects from over-fishing, salmon farming, climate change, habitat alteration by logging, mining, agriculture and dams have extinguished over 100 stocks of salmon and 700 are at risk in British Columbia.
Photo: Mike Grandmaison
Photo: Mike Grandmaison
Canada’s nature is the envy of the world but our Species at Risk Act isn’t effective enough. A recent study showed that over 50% of Canadian wildlife species are experiencing population declines. So you might be asking yourself, how can over half of Canadian wildlife be declining if we have a Species at Risk Act that is supposed to protect them?
Photo: Wayne Lynch
Photo: Wayne Lynch
In Canada, the endangered northern spotted owl is found only in the southwestern corner of British Columbia. This handsome medium-sized owl, with its unusual dark-brown eyes, relies on old-growth forests to roost, nest and forage. Due to ongoing logging of the old-growth forests of southwestern British Columbia scientists estimate that less than a dozen owls now remain in the wild in Canada.
Photo: Isabelle Groc
Photo: Isabelle Groc
Did you know BC has no endangered species legislation? Most people are unaware that although BC has the greatest biodiversity in the country, we have the highest number of species at risk - all receiving virtually zero protection.
Photo: Isabelle Groc
Photo: Isabelle Groc
Among the most iconic species in BC are the southern resident orcas or killer whales. Found in the international waters between BC and Washington state, these 76 whales are under threat from toxins, acoustic disturbances and diminished food supplies. There is also the looming, and very real threat, of an oil spill in the Salish Sea which would be catastrophic for the orca population.