Letter: Hydrogen Strategy for Canada should focus on renewable hydrogen 

Friday, November 27, 2020
Joseph Brent via Flickr
Joseph Brent via Flickr

LA VERSION FRANÇAISE SUIT

 

To: Seamus O'Regan, Minister of Natural Resources

Cc: Chrystia Freeland, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance 

Jonathan Wilkinson, Minister of Environment and Climate Change 

Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry 

 

Re: Hydrogen Strategy for Canada should focus on renewable hydrogen 

 

Dear Minister O’Regan, 

 

As the government rolls out its national hydrogen strategy, critical decisions about Canada’s future role in the emerging hydrogen economy must be made. We recognize the potential of renewable hydrogen to play a critical role in decarbonizing some of the more hard-to-abate sectors. Strategic deployment of renewable hydrogen technology will help Canada meet its climate commitments under the Paris Agreement, setting us on a pathway to net-zero emissions as soon as possible before 2050. There is a real opportunity for Canada to become a world leader in this new green energy industry. However, based on your draft executive summary this risks being undermined by a focus on fossil fuel-derived hydrogen.  

Only renewable hydrogen is truly emissions-free, and as such, renewable hydrogen aligns with the deep decarbonization required to tackle climate change. A focus on enabling renewable hydrogen is the only way to have an emission-free hydrogen strategy that aligns with the profound transformation required to move Canada’s energy system from one largely based on fossil fuels to renewable energy systems. 

However, the oil and gas sector is pushing for governments to invest in fossil fuel derived hydrogen as a way to search for a new market for their products as the world transitions away from fossil fuels. Reuters has even quoted government officials saying exactly this – that they see hydrogen as a “net-zero moon shot” for the petroleum sector. We are deeply concerned that the government is caving to the demands of the industry rather than identifying what is in the Canadian economy’s best interest, given the focus on fossil hydrogen in the draft executive summary. Both the European Commission and German government hydrogen strategies published this summer are clear in setting out renewable hydrogen as the only sustainable hydrogen source, and Canada must follow suit.

There is little scientific or economic evidence that investing in fossil hydrogen production can make a meaningful and cost-effective contribution to achieving a zero-emissions economy. Its abatement potential relies on carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, an unproven technology which falls short of a zero-emissions objective and is still prohibitively expensive. In addition, CCS does not address methane leakage from the production or transportation of natural gas - and as we know, methane emissions are consistently underreported.  Nor does it address the other impacts associated with exploring and developing fossil gas deposits, including Indigenous rights violations, biodiversity, water, air quality, and the industry's failures to remediate wells. Renewable hydrogen is projected to be more cost-effective than even unabated fossil hydrogen by 2030. Fossil-fuel based technologies are expected to have limited cost reduction potential relative to the expected cost reductions for electrolysis. While most of the technologies used for blue hydrogen are already mature technologies, there is still a lot of potential for innovation and cost reduction in the green hydrogen process, as large scale electrolysis is a novel field of application. 

All new government investments must be focused on rapid transition to carbon-free energy systems. To the extent that any public resources are available for hydrogen development, they should be reserved for renewable hydrogen for the hardest-to-decarbonize sectors that do not have viable decarbonization alternatives. Canada should not be providing any form of financial support for the development of fossil-fuel derived hydrogen. Support for research and development of natural gas for the production of hydrogen, as well as for infrastructure, falls under the international definitions for fossil fuel subsidies. Any funding for fossil hydrogen is a fossil fuel subsidy and goes against Canada’s G7 and G20 commitments to eliminate inefficient subsidies.

Hydrogen is and will continue to be a scarce resource during the growth of this emerging energy sector. Scaling up its production and converting fuel systems to use it will take time, hence it should be prioritised for the sectors most difficult to decarbonise, where there aren’t other viable options. Hydrogen use will need to be targeted at industrial processes that are not easily directly electrified, such as low carbon steel production. In the transport sector, renewable hydrogen should be used where cleaner alternatives do not exist, like aviation. 

Hydrogen is not a suitable alternative fuel for space and water heating, as suggested in the draft strategy, because of energy conversion losses and existing infrastructure is not equipped to handle more than a very low percentage of hydrogen blended into fossil gas, due to the corrosive nature of pure hydrogen to steel. Household appliances, likewise, are not equipped to burn pure hydrogen. The draft strategy supports the injection of hydrogen into the gas grid for space and water heating, but in effect, this is merely an argument for extended use and reliance on fossil gas. Blending a negligible volume of hydrogen into carbon-emitting fossil gas is a dangerous distraction from realistic measures to decarbonize space and water heating, specifically retrofits, energy efficiency and heat pumps.  

We are also concerned about linking hydrogen to the development of small modular reactors (SMR), given significant concerns with the feasibility, costs, safety and timeliness of the technology. SMRs are an expensive distraction from more viable, cost-competitive decarbonization solutions. Developing new nuclear energy is too slow to address the climate crisis – as well as more expensive – compared to renewable energy and energy efficiency. No SMRs have yet been built and the models being proposed will take a decade or more to develop. A Canadian study found that energy from small nuclear reactors would be up to ten times the cost of renewable energy. Nuclear-powered hydrogen is not renewable hydrogen.    

Finally, the debate around hydrogen has been defined by the use of a colour code “green/blue/grey/etc.”. This only serves the fossil fuel industry as it masks the real environmental impacts of blue hydrogen. We therefore believe that no such coding should be used in official documents. The correct definitions should be renewable hydrogen (using only renewable electricity via electrolysis) and fossil hydrogen (all other types). 

We’re in the middle of a climate emergency and what’s needed is strong leadership to move us away from dependence on the dirty oil, coal and gas fuels that are causing this crisis. The development of a hydrogen strategy must be truly green, building on Canada’s renewable energy advantages, and not be a route to keep the fossil fuel industry limping on past its sell by date. 

Sincerely,

Julia Levin, Environmental Defence Canada

Teika Newton, Climate Action Network Canada

Émile Boisseau-Bouvier, Équiterre

Keith Stewart, Greenpeace 

Tom Green, David Suzuki Foundation 

Robin Edger, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment

Bronwen Tucker, Oil Change International

Tzeporah Berman, Stand.Earth 

Peter McCartney, Wilderness Committee 

Kate Higgins, Oxfam Canada

Jamie Kneen, MiningWatch Canada

Gurprasad Gurumurthy, Ecology Action Centre

Gretchen Fitzgerald, Sierra Club Canada Foundation 

Cam Fenton, 350.org

Angus Wong, SumOfUs

Claire Gallagher, Leadnow  

Caitlyn Vernon, Sierra Club BC

André-Yanne Parent, Climate Reality Project 

Adam Scott, Shift | Action for Pension Wealth and Planet Health

Regan Boychuk, Alberta Liabilities Disclosure Project 

Tracey Saxby, My Sea to Sky

Brennain Lloyd, Northwatch

Angela Bischoff, Ontario Clean Air Alliance

Citizens' Climate Lobby Canada

Energy Mix Productions

Climate Justice Victoria

Howard Breen, Extinction Rebellion Vancouver Island

 

À: Seamus O'Regan, Ministre des Ressources naturelles

 

Cc: Chrystia Freeland, Vice-Première Ministre et Ministre des Finances

Jonathan Wilkinson, Ministre de l’Environnement et du Changement climatique 

Navdeep Bains, Ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et de l'Industrie


Objet : La Stratégie canadienne sur l’hydrogène devrait se concentrer sur l’hydrogène renouvelable

 

Monsieur le Ministre O’Regan, 

 

Alors que le gouvernement présente sa stratégie nationale sur l'hydrogène, des décisions importantes doivent être prises quant au rôle futur du Canada dans l'économie émergente de l'hydrogène.

Nous reconnaissons que l'hydrogène renouvelable peut jouer un rôle essentiel dans certains des secteurs les plus difficiles à décarboner. Le déploiement stratégique de la technologie de l'hydrogène renouvelable aidera le Canada à respecter ses engagements climatiques dans le cadre de l'Accord de Paris, nous mettant sur la voie du zéro émission nette le plus tôt possible d’ici 2050. Le Canada a une réelle opportunité de devenir un leader mondial de cette nouvelle industrie de l'énergie verte. Toutefois, selon votre projet de sommaire, cette possibilité risque d'être compromise par la place importante accordée à l'hydrogène dérivé des combustibles fossiles.  

Seul l'hydrogène issu de sources renouvelables est réellement exempt d'émissions de gaz à effet de serre et s’aligne à nos objectifs de décarbonation profonde pour lutter contre les changements climatiques. Se concentrer sur l'hydrogène renouvelable est la seule façon d’assurer que la stratégie sur l'hydrogène sans émissions contribue à la transformation nécessaire pour que le système énergétique canadien réponde aux défis climatiques. 

Cependant, le secteur gazier et pétrolier fait pression sur les gouvernements pour qu'ils investissent dans l'hydrogène dérivé des combustibles fossiles afin de trouver un nouveau marché pour leurs produits alors que le monde se détourne de ceux-ci. L’agence de presse Reuters a même cité des responsables gouvernementaux affirmant exactement ceci: ils voient l'hydrogène comme une «approche de la dernière chance vers la carboneutralité» pour le secteur pétrolier. 

Nous sommes donc profondément préoccupé·e·s par le fait que le gouvernement cède aux demandes de l'industrie plutôt que d'identifier ce qui est dans le meilleur intérêt de l'économie canadienne, étant donné l'accent mis sur l'hydrogène fossile dans le projet de sommaire. Les stratégies de la Commission européenne et du gouvernement allemand en matière d'hydrogène publiées cet été établissent clairement que l'hydrogène renouvelable est la seule source d'hydrogène durable. Le Canada doit suivre cet exemple.

Il existe peu de preuves scientifiques et économiques que les investissements dans la production d'hydrogène fossile puissent contribuer de manière significative et rentable à la réalisation d'une économie zéro émission. Son potentiel de réduction repose sur la technologie du captage et du stockage du carbone (CSC), une technologie non éprouvée qui ne permet pas d'atteindre l'objectif de zéro émission et dont le coût reste prohibitif. En outre, le CSC ne s'attaque pas aux fuites de méthane provenant de la production ou du transport du gaz naturel et, comme nous le savons, les émissions de méthane sont systématiquement sous-évaluées.  Cette technologie n'aborde pas non plus les autres impacts liés à l'exploration et à l'exploitation des gisements de gaz fossile, notamment les atteintes aux droits des populations autochtones, la biodiversité, la qualité de l'eau et de l'air, et l'incapacité de l'industrie à remettre en état les puits. D'ici 2030, l'hydrogène renouvelable devrait être plus rentable que l'hydrogène fossile. Les technologies basées sur les combustibles fossiles devraient avoir un potentiel de réduction des coûts limité par rapport aux réductions de coûts attendues pour l'électrolyse. Si la plupart des technologies utilisées pour l'hydrogène bleu sont déjà matures, il existe encore un grand potentiel d'innovation et de réduction des coûts dans la production d'hydrogène vert, car l'électrolyse à grande échelle est un nouveau domaine d'application.

Tous les nouveaux investissements publics doivent être axés sur une transition rapide vers des systèmes énergétiques sans carbone. Dans la mesure où des ressources publiques sont disponibles pour le développement de l'hydrogène, elles doivent être réservées à l'hydrogène renouvelable pour les secteurs les plus difficiles à décarboner qui ne disposent pas d'alternatives viables. Le Canada ne devrait fournir aucune aide financière pour le développement de l'hydrogène dérivé des combustibles fossiles. Le soutien à la recherche et au développement du gaz naturel pour la production d'hydrogène, ainsi qu'aux infrastructures, correspond aux définitions internationales des subventions aux combustibles fossiles. Tout financement de l'hydrogène fossile est une subvention aux combustibles fossiles et va à l'encontre des engagements pris par le Canada dans le cadre du G7 et du G20 pour éliminer les subventions inefficaces.

L'hydrogène est et continuera d'être une ressource limitée malgré la croissance de ce secteur énergétique émergent. L'augmentation de sa production et la conversion des installations en vue de son utilisation prendront du temps; c'est pourquoi il convient de donner la priorité aux secteurs les plus difficiles à décarboner, où il n'existe pas d'autres options viables. L'utilisation de l'hydrogène devra être ciblée sur les processus industriels qui ne peuvent être pas électrifiés facilement, tels que la production d'acier faible en carbone. Dans le secteur des transports, l'hydrogène renouvelable devrait être utilisé là où il n'existe pas d'autres solutions plus propres, soit dans des industries telles que l'aviation.

L'hydrogène n'est pas un combustible de substitution approprié pour le chauffage des bâtiments et de l'eau, comme le suggère le projet de stratégie nationale, en raison des pertes dues à la conversion de l'énergie. De plus, les infrastructures existantes ne sont pas équipées pour traiter plus qu'un très faible pourcentage d'hydrogène mélangé au gaz fossile, en raison de la nature corrosive de l'hydrogène pur pour l'acier. De même, les appareils ménagers ne sont pas équipés pour brûler de l'hydrogène pur. Le projet de stratégie nationale soutient l'injection d'hydrogène dans le réseau de gaz pour le chauffage des bâtiments et de l'eau, mais il ne s'agit simplement que d'un argument en faveur d'une utilisation et d'une dépendance accrues à l'égard du gaz fossile. Le fait de mélanger un volume négligeable d'hydrogène à du gaz fossile émetteur de carbone constitue une dangereuse distraction par rapport aux mesures réalistes visant à décarboner le chauffage des bâtiments et de l'eau, en particulier les rénovations, l'efficacité énergétique et les pompes à chaleur.

Nous sommes également inquiet·ète·s face à l’association de l'hydrogène au développement de petits réacteurs modulaires (PRM), en raison des préoccupations importantes concernant la faisabilité, les coûts, la sécurité et le temps de mise en œuvre de cette technologie. Les PRM représentent une distraction coûteuse par rapport à des solutions de décarbonation plus viables et plus compétitives en termes de coûts. Le développement de la nouvelle énergie nucléaire est trop lent pour faire face à la crise climatique - et plus coûteux - par rapport aux énergies renouvelables et à l'efficacité énergétique. Aucun PRM n'a encore été construit et les modèles proposés prendront une décennie ou plus à se développer. Une étude canadienne a révélé que l'énergie provenant de petits réacteurs nucléaires serait jusqu'à dix fois plus chère que l'énergie renouvelable. L'hydrogène d'origine nucléaire ne constitue donc pas un hydrogène renouvelable.    

Enfin, le débat autour de l'hydrogène a été défini par l'utilisation d'un code couleur « vert/bleu/gris/etc. ». Ce code ne sert qu'à l'industrie des combustibles fossiles, car il masque les véritables impacts environnementaux de l'hydrogène bleu. Par conséquent, nous pensons qu'un tel code ne devrait pas être utilisé dans les documents officiels. Les définitions adéquates des types d’hydrogène devraient plutôt être « l'hydrogène renouvelable » (utilisant uniquement de l'électricité issues de sources renouvelables par électrolyse) et « l'hydrogène fossile » (tous les autres types).

En pleine urgence climatique, nous avons besoin d'un leadership fort pour mettre fin à notre dépendance au pétrole, au charbon et au gaz qui sont à l'origine de cette crise. L'élaboration d'une stratégie sur l'hydrogène se doit d’être véritablement verte et de s'appuyer sur les avantages du Canada en matière d'énergies renouvelables au lieu de se camoufler derrière un vernis vert qui laisserait l'industrie des combustibles fossiles poursuivre ses activités impunément.

 

Cordialement,

Julia Levin, Environmental Defence Canada

Teika Newton, Climate Action Network Canada

Émile Boisseau-Bouvier, Équiterre

Keith Stewart, Greenpeace 

Tom Green, David Suzuki Foundation 

Robin Edger, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment

Bronwen Tucker, Oil Change International

Tzeporah Berman, Stand.Earth 

Peter McCartney, Wilderness Committee 

Kate Higgins, Oxfam Canada

Jamie Kneen, MiningWatch Canada

Gurprasad Gurumurthy, Ecology Action Centre

Gretchen Fitzgerald, Sierra Club Canada Foundation 

Cam Fenton, 350.org

Angus Wong, SumOfUs

Claire Gallagher, Leadnow  

Caitlyn Vernon, Sierra Club BC

André-Yanne Parent, Climate Reality Project 

Adam Scott, Shift | Action for Pension Wealth and Planet Health

Regan Boychuk, Alberta Liabilities Disclosure Project 

Tracey Saxby, My Sea to Sky

Brennain Lloyd, Northwatch

Angela Bischoff, Ontario Clean Air Alliance

Citizens' Climate Lobby Canada

Energy Mix Productions

Climate Justice Victoria

Howard Breen, Extinction Rebellion Vancouver Island

More from this campaign